Nine Years of Data: What are We Starting to Learn?

Over the past nine years, 464 people have been trained as certified Nature Mappers and have entered 47,829 observations into the Nature Mapping Jackson Hole program’s central database.

All this effort is filling wildlife observation and distribution needs not already covered by state and federal agencies or local research organizations. Furthermore, together we are fostering a community that looks deeper into the meanings of science and citizenship – therefore, realizing that to participate in the building of knowledge about how our world works, can have profound implications for the way we, Jackson Hole, relate to our natural environment and shape its future.

Thank you for getting involved in the experiences of seeing, feeling, and understanding nature in all its amazingness through Nature Mapping Jackson Hole.

Below is a current snapshot of our database (Note: numbers reflect entries made in the database as of December 7, 2017). In the coming year, JHWF will take a deeper look into the database to better understand data related to volunteer participation and to identify potential increases or declines in any species over time. Stay tuned, there is more to come!

2017 Observations by Project:

  • Project Backyard – 2,611
  • Casual Observations – 3,244
  • Moose Day – 166

2017 Observations by Species:

  • Reptiles and Amphibians – 71
  • Birds – 3,806
  • Mammals – 2,126


Figure 1. Total number of active Nature Mappers by year (2009-2017)


Figure 2. Number of newly trained Nature Mappers by year (2009-2017)


Figure 3. Total number of observations by status in the Nature Mapping Database


Figure 4. Percentage of Nature Mapping observations that are located on public vs. private lands (verified observations; 2009-2017)


Figure 5. Total number of species entered by Nature Mappers (includes verified, unverified and deleted observations; 2009-2017)


Figure 6. Total number of species by type entered by Nature Mappers (includes verified, unverified and deleted observations; 2009-2017)

Celebrate Wildlife

Enjoy monthly updates from the JHWF and stay informed about our work.

You have Successfully Subscribed!