Creating Healthier Foraging for Wildlife

While it is always good to eat your vegetables, wildlife thrives on native plants. Invasive weed removal re-establishes a healthy foraging environment for wildlife.

Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation is committed to treating invasive weeds annually, and we have “adopted” Coburn Meadows, an area wildlife frequently utilize in Jackson’s Bridger-Teton National Forest.

While a popular recreation destination, Coburn Meadows faces challenges from invasive plant species. The Forest Service relies on volunteer efforts to combat the spread of these plants to preserve the natural beauty and ecological health of this important habitat. Without volunteers assisting the long-term management of weed removal at this location, the effort would not be done effectively, if at all.  JHWF returns to this exact site several times during the year to manage invasive species and maintain the indigenous landscape.

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Pesky Plants: What Weeds to Remove and How to Do It

Target Species:

Musk and Bull Thistle: Remove musk thistle using a shovel to chop the root at least 1-2 inches below the soil. If the thistle has yet to flower, it is appropriate to leave the plant on the ground. If the thistle has bolted, and any purple/pink color of the flower is showing, cut the head off, bag, and remove from site.

Houndstongue: Use the same technique as above. If the flower is showing or the plant has already gone to seed, bag and remove these parts of the plant. In previous years, plant skeletons still had viable seeds attached, and they should also be removed. Houndstongue seeds have Velcro-like properties that aid in their dispersal. Check clothes, socks, hair, gloves, tools, etc. for potential “hitchhikers.”

Working Outside

We will provide a water cooler and snacks. Please bring a lunch of your own.

Always expect to be working on uneven ground and to be working in vegetation. You should wear layered clothes, long pants, sturdy shoes, and bring a jacket. Sun protection (hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen lotion) and bug spray is highly recommended. JHWF will provide work gloves and shovels on site. If you prefer to supply your own garden gloves, feel free todo so. Bring your bear spray and wear it on you!

Waivers and Liability: Prior to participation we ask each volunteer for the 2024 season to please sign (once) and return our general liability waiver here.

What to Bring with You

  • Long sleeved pants and shirt

  • Jacket or raincoat

  • Boots

  • Gloves

  • Hat

  • Sunscreen

  • Water

  • Food

  • Bear Spray

How to get to the Meadows

Volunteers coming from north/Jackson will meet in the Smith’s parking lot (SE corner) at 8:00 AM. For those coming from other directions or who would simply rather drive directly to the project location, the directions are:

From Jackson: take Highway22 to Wilson, then turn left onto Fall Creek Road. Stay on Fall Creek Road for approximately 15 miles. Turn right into Coburn Meadow.

From south of Jackson: turn onto South Fall Creek Road off Highway 89, across the road from Pritchard Boat Ramp. Drive approximately 4 miles to Coburn Meadow making sure to veer left once there’s a fork in the road (stay on S. Fall Creek Rd.) Turn left into Coburn Meadow.

The site is recognizable by a large gravel lot, signage, and designated tent sites. The road is accessible to most vehicles, but note that it is a typical, bumpy dirt Forest Service road.

We’ll aim to start working on the project at 9:00 AM and will likely finish before lunchtime depending on the number of volunteers.

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