The Snake River  Corridor  

 

 Vital ground for Wyoming’s wildlife

With a shared community goal to conserve Jackson Hole’s ecosystem for its beauty, environmental health benefits, and contributions to our economy, it is essential to preserve and protect our valley’s riparian habitat along the Snake River Corridor.

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What is the Snake River Corridor?

Vital ground – Adopting a wildlife perspective

The Snake River Corridor is Jackson Hole’s primary artery for wildlife movement and migration. It links sections of habitat, increasingly fragmented by human development, and acts as a refuge for many of the West’s most beloved species. We hope that by viewing the landscape through the eyes of the wild animals we share it with, collectively we can better understand and protect this vital ground.

Scroll through our ‘Vital Ground’ StoryMap below to learn more, or click the blue button below to visit this StoryMap in full screen.

Identifying threats to the Snake River Corridor

 

Although the Snake River Corridor provides relatively intact habitat, wildlife must navigate an array of human obstacles, even in protected areas such as Grand Teton National Park. Off-leash dogs. New roads and bridges. An ever expanding human footprint. As residential development and tourism grows our impacts on wildlife intensify. 

 Fragmentation, isolation and degradation of habitats threatens many species’ long-term resilience. Click the boxes below to learn more.

Roads

Several of our valley’s most prominent wildlife-vehicle collision hotspots occur along the Snake River.

Habitat Loss

Habitat loss and fragmentation is a constant threat to wildlife along the Snake River.

Fences

Fences can serve as barriers forcing wildlife onto roadways and separating young animals from their mothers. 

Human Disturbance

2.6 million people visit Jackson Hole each year, increasing stress and introducing conflict on native wildlife.

Simple Steps to Protect Moose

  • Control dogs in moose habitat
  • Drive the speed limit especially at night, dawn and dusk
  • Plant native plants in your yard
  • Give moose extra space in winter, during the rut, and during calving season.
  • Consider a conservation easement on your property

Simple Steps to Protect Elk

  • Abide by winter range closures
  • Drive the speed limit especially at night, dawn and dusk
  • Support public investment in wildlife crossing structures
  • Convert fences to “wildlife-friendly” styles
  • Consider a conservation easement on your property

Simple Steps to Protect Mule Deer

  • Abide by winter range closures
  • Drive the speed limit especially at night, dawn and dusk
  • Support public investment in wildlife crossing structures
  • Convert fences to “wildlife-friendly” styles

Simple steps to protect Trumpeter Swan

  • Give nesting swans space so nests are not abandoned
  • Support wetland restoration projects
  • Keep waterways clean by limiting fertilizer use
  • Do not build fences over waterways

 

Working together to ensure a wildlife-friendly future for the Snake River Corridor

As stewards of the land, when we view the landscape in terms of our uses as well as wildlife’s needs, we can increase our capacity to make decisions beneficial to all.

If we view the landscape as wildlife would, how could this affect our development decisions?

For example, what remaining natural, undeveloped landscape elements should be preserved in their unimpaired state?

Are there areas where concentrating human development would minimize impacts to wildlife?

“There is growing awareness of the beauty of country… a sincere desire to keep some of it for all time. People are beginning to value highly the fact that a river runs unimpeded for a distance…

They are beginning to obtain deep satisfaction from the fact that a herd of elk may be observed in back country. They are beginning to seek the healing relaxation that is possible in wild country. In short, they want it.”

- Olaus Murie

Celebrate Wildlife!

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