About Nature Mapping Jackson Hole

Nature Mapping Jackson Hole is a group of volunteer citizens working collectively to create a long-term dataset containing wildlife observations. When everyone contributes a small amount of data, the end result is enormous. Nature Mapping Jackson Hole strives to fill wildlife observation and distribution needs not already covered by state and federal agencies or local research organizations.

A History Thanks to Meg and Bert Raynes



Nature Mapping Jackson Hole was begun in 2009 by a group of dedicated volunteers and local biologists under the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund. In 2011, a cooperative relationship between the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation and the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund began in order to build on the initial success of the Nature Mapping Jackson Hole program.

Nature Mapping Jackson Hole Database

Nature Mapping Jackson Hole strives to fill wildlife observation and distribution needs not already covered by state and federal agencies or local research organizations. Creating a long-term dataset on all species, collecting data on private and public lands, and providing able bodies to work collaboratively with other research organizations on projects that lack resources, are niches Nature Mapping is striving to fill in Jackson Hole’s wildlife-rich community.

Goals of Nature Mapping Jackson Hole

Nature Mapping Jackson Hole is a long-term, citizen science research project with the goals of:

  1. Keeping common species common (studying all species not just high-profile species or species of concern).
  2. Increasing citizen’s knowledge of and appreciation for wildlife in Teton County, WY.
  3. Engaging citizens in long-term wildlife data collection.
  4. Informing management decisions that favor wildlife sustainability.
  5. Contribute data to the Wyoming Game & Fish Department’s Wildlife Observation System (WOS) to augment state data.

Nature Mapping Certification Training 

Volunteer Coordinator and Certification Trainer Frances Clark leads a course to introduce wildlife enthusiasts to the Nature Mapping Jackson Hole program. She provides some basic species identification training and guides Nature Mappers through the process that will enable them to add their observations to the Nature Mapping database. Please email Kate Gersh (kate@jhwildlife.org) to join.

Please be aware of Nature Mapping Data Collection Guidelines Related to Private Property

“Far Afield” trailer: JenTen Productions.

It’s fun to open somebody’s eyes the way mine were opened. You can sit there and see them get the spark and think, there, I’ve ruined another life. They’re gonna be bird watchers. Satisfying.

Bert Raynes

Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund

Total Observations

Trained Mappers

Moose Observed on 2017 Moose Day

2017 Moose Day Volunteers

2017 Nature Mapping Community Celebration

Thanks to all who joined us for our annual celebration of our wildlife-friendly community of citizen scientists on March 22nd.

We celebrated Nature Mapping Jackson Hole with this unique event that combines a communal potluck dinner with a feature presentation on wildlife science by Doug Smith, all within the elegant environment of the Center for the Arts.

Read How many elk do Yellowstone wolves eat? by Angus Thuermer based on the information that Doug Smith presented here.

 

Thank you also to our generous in-kind supporters:

Thanks to the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund, Doug Smith, Yellowstone National Park and the entire Nature Mapping community for making the evening possible.

“Our ability to perceive quality in nature begins, as in art, with the pretty. It expands through successive stages of the beautiful to values as yet uncaptured by language.” - Aldo Leopold

Data Request Process – How it Works

  1. Requester submits a data request using the info on this form. Please fill out the information found on the form as completely as possible and explicitly tell us why you are requesting Nature Mapping data.
  2. Nature Mapping Advisory Committee reviews the data request at their monthly meeting.
  3. If the request is approved, the requester will sign a data release agreement with Nature Mapping/JHWF.
  4. Data will be delivered electronically as either a shapefile or Microsoft Excel document.
  5. Requester’s end products will be delivered to Nature Mapping/ JHWF per the timeline outlined in the data request form.
  6. The intent is for wildlife to benefit from this cooperative agreement.

Data may be provided to individuals or organizations on a demonstrated need basis for single use purposes related to the appropriate conservation and management of wildlife in Teton County, Wyoming. Data requests submitted by area agencies, research organizations and land management organizations which may positively influence wildlife management decisions are encouraged.

At no time should Nature Mapping data (partial or in total) be redistributed by the recipient to third parties whether for a fee or free of charge. Data recipient should direct all other parties to request data directly from Nature Mapping Jackson Hole/Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation. Data may not be provided to any entity for the creation of independent datasets.

Photo Credits:

Henry Holdsworth
Mark Gocke
Steve Morriss
Sava Malachowski
Leine Stikkel
Tim Griffith
Jon Mobeck

Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation

330 N. Glenwood Street
Jackson, WY 83002
(307) 739-0968
All rights reserved.

Celebrate Wildlife

Enjoy monthly updates from the JHWF and stay informed about our work.

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